Q-and-A: Matt Radicelli, Rock The House

As part of an ongoing series, Mind Your Business will be sitting down with COSE Investor Level Members to get to know more about their business and the guiding principles they use to build their business. Today’s Q-and-A is with Matt Radicelli of Rock The House.

Matt Radicelli is the founder and CEO of Rock The House, a Cleveland-based entertainment and production company and COSE member that provides world-class service for just about any type of event celebration. Radicelli founded Rock The House back in 1999 as a small, home-based business. Over the years, the company has rapidly grown and developed into the region’s finest interactive entertainment and audio-visual production company. Since 1999, Rock The House has exceeded expectations by providing amazing talent, cutting-edge products and services, and award-winning customer service. Producing more than 1,800 events per year, the dedicated Rock The House team spends countless hours on each event with one goal in mind: To make their clients’ events ROCK. Every time.

Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll



    Pre-Check




                        Matt Radicelli 

                   


    Title

    Founder, CEO, Rock The House

    On the Web

    www.rockthehouse.com, www.rthav.com

    Mind Your Business sat down with Radicelli recently to find out more about some of the guiding principles he uses to grow his business.

    MYB: What is the best piece of advice you've been given and who gave it to you?

    Radicelli: I think it was Beyoncé who said, “Put a ring on it.” That was for my wife. But with regard to business, during my time in the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program, Monika Moss-Gransberry said that “Anybody who can be your competitor can be your partner.” That stuck with me and had a real impact on our business practices going forward.

    MYB: What is one example of how you've applied this advice to your business?

    Radicelli: Many people don’t know it, but Rock The House is comprised of a number of divisions. Our audiovisual and production division is by far the largest, but two of the entertainment divisions are the result of acquisitions of previous competitors, Selective Sound Entertainment and Zone Entertainment. I believe that you can accomplish more if everyone’s interests are aligned. When you let go of ego and embrace opportunities to learn and grow as a team, amazing things can happen.

    MYB: Who would you consider to be a mentor for you professionally and how have you cultivated that relationship?

    Radicelli: In my early years, my parents were absolutely my entrepreneurial catalysts. They mentored me in various ways with regard to business practices, beyond just normal parenting. As my business started to evolve, my mentors were professionals in every walk of life, including some of my customers. Mentors became those people who were willing to answer all of the questions that an eager and knowledge-hungry young entrepreneur asked them. Flash forward to now. I believe it’s very important to be open to mentorship, education, and growth opportunities. That is what led us to be a part of Think Tank, a national benchmark group of entertainment and production owners, of which I am the director. Through national benchmarking groups such as this, I’ve developed relationships with a number of mentors. On a local level, each year the Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) provides its members with mentorship as part of the program. I’ve been privileged to have a number of really strong mentors as part of that organization.

    MYB: How has your relationship with your mentors impacted the way you do business?

    Radicelli: Mentorship is about knowing and understanding that you don’t know everything. Having direct access to people who are willing to share experiences, good and bad, and to equip you to make the best decisions with what you have at hand is an invaluable asset. Between Think Tank, EO, and additional networking and professional relationships, I choose to surround myself with people who are open and willing to share experiences freely. We need to embrace our vulnerability and learn from each other if we are going to grow, personally and professionally. Without these groups and mentor/mentee relationships, it’s possible that we would still arrive at where we are today, but we’d be at least ten years behind.

    MYB: And now for some shameless self-promotion, we have to ask: What value do you get out of being a COSE member?

    Radicelli: We are honored to be a part of a thriving community of event professionals and entrepreneurs in the Northeast Ohio area. With that important relationship comes a dedication to innovation and involvement in the community. As a COSE member, we are empowered to connect with other small business leaders and share experiences through countless networking and educational opportunities. There are so many resources made available through the COSE website that are incredibly helpful for small businesses—from strategic planning courses and local business news to entertainment and insurance discounts.

    Learn more about the benefits of being a COSE Member by clicking here. Or, contact our Membership Team directly via email at memberservices@cose.org or by phone at 216-592-2355.


    Grasshopper
    Next up: Selling to the CIO Part 1

    Selling to the CIO Part 1

    Tom Lucas, CIO of Sherwin-Williams, George Mehok, CIO of Revol Wireless and Pete Regan, Director with IBM share their insight into getting the attention of, and selling to, CIOs.

    Tom Lucas, CIO of Sherwin-Williams, George Mehok, CIO of Revol Wireless and Pete Regan, Director with IBM share their insight into getting the attention of, and selling to, CIOs.

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll
    Pre-Check
    Next up: Selling to the CIO Part 2

    Selling to the CIO Part 2

    This is part 2 of our Selling to the CIO session featuring Tom Lucas (Sherwin-Williams), George Mehok (Revol) and Pete Reagan (IBM).

    This is part 2 of our Selling to the CIO session featuring Tom Lucas (Sherwin-Williams), George Mehok (Revol) and Pete Reagan (IBM).

    Listen here.

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll
    Next up: Strategic Implications of the Chief Digital Officer

    Strategic Implications of the Chief Digital Officer

    What are the strategic implications of the role of Chief Digital Officer and how does it affect your company and your strategies? Is this a role that needs to be developed at your company? 

    Information roles in companies are constantly evolving; in fact the very existence of the CIO role evolved out of changes in business technologies many years ago. Rapidly advancing changes in information technology, particularly around digital connections to customers, partners, vendors and more has led to a new role: Chief Digital Officer. 

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll

    What are the strategic implications of the role of Chief Digital Officer and how does it affect your company and your strategies? Is this a role that needs to be developed at your company? 

    Paul Stefanuk, partner with Paul-Lawrence, a national executive search firm, shares insight into this developing role. What industries are embracing this change? Where does it fit organizationally? How does the role drive enterprise performance and how does it interface with traditional information technology operations?

    Pre-Check
    Grasshopper
    Next up: The 3 'I's' of Leadership

    The 3 'I's' of Leadership

    There are so many different views and perspectives on leadership—so many that I sometimes wonder how anyone is supposed to discern the essentials. At the same time, it’s important to have some leadership foundations that you can use to build your own leadership model, and the simpler the better. Enter the three “I’s” of leadership:

    There are so many different views and perspectives on leadership—so many that I sometimes wonder how anyone is supposed to discern the essentials. At the same time, it’s important to have some leadership foundations that you can use to build your own leadership model, and the simpler the better. Enter the three “I’s” of leadership:

    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll
    • Intention
    • Influence
    • Impact

    With clarity around these three leadership “I’s” you will have a firm foundation for whatever leadership role you’re playing, no matter the arena where you’re serving as a leader.

    Pre-Check

    Intention—Leaders are intentional. Leaders live and lead on purpose. They are thoughtful and discerning when it comes to who they are and what they’re seeking to achieve. History has shown us that leaders can influence people, but often their leadership is more about playing a role than purposefully creating outcomes and impacts. In other words, these leaders use their influence without thoughtful intentions. If you want to be an effective leader, being intentional in all aspects of your leadership will serve you (and those you serve) well.

    Influence—Leadership is about influence, and the essence of influence is being a person that people want to follow. It means engaging people behind a cause, mission, vision, purpose or values. Influence is the outcome of being authentic as a leader, which allows you to build the deep levels of trust that draw people to you, engage people and commit them to being a part of your plan and vision.

    Impact—Leadership is about impact, not actions. Leaders are acutely focused on their desired impact (beyond goals and objectives), and impact equates to creating something long-lasting. While some “leaders” are focused on their personal agendas and legacy, true leaders are focused on organizational, institutional, community and global legacy.

    What about you?

    Will you be intentional? Are you committed to being the kind of person and leader that people will trust and want to follow? What’s your “why” as a leader (personally and professionally), and is your “why” more about impact than outcomes?

    These might seem like easy questions and they are, but only if you’re willing to be authentic, vulnerable and honest in assessing yourself. Many so-called leaders never even ask these questions, let alone honestly answer them. Many leaders claim to desire feedback from others (often the best source of honest perspectives and the best way for identifying blind spots), yet they never take action on the feedback—believing they already are the leader they want to be. We live in a world where leadership is often defined by effectiveness, rather than impact. Where leaders are judged more on their ability to be decisive than on their willingness to be vulnerable. Based upon the state of affairs in our world, it’s time for a change—time for a new type of leader. Authentic, vulnerable and courageous!

    In the end, leadership is a choice, and the three “I’s” outlined above are individual choices that collectively represent that larger choice. Once that choice is made, you can commit to these three I’s in order to be the type of leader that makes a difference with people, in organizations, in businesses, in initiatives and in the community.  The time is now—time for a new type of leader who is focused on intention, influence and impact. Will you choose to embrace the “I’s” of leadership?

    Join me on Tuesday, June 21st at the COSE Business Boot Camp as we take a dive into what it means to be an authentic leader and the impact authentic leaders can unleash. No matter your title or role, this session will help you tap into a whole other level of personal and professional leadership.

    Grasshopper
    Next up: The Importance of Effective Goal-Setting for Small Businesses

    The Importance of Effective Goal-Setting for Small Businesses

    Setting goals and establishing a clear vision are important parts of running your own business. But the types of goals we set, how well they are communicated throughout the company, and how closely our teams are united around and act consistently on these goals will ultimately determine the effectiveness of your goal-setting process and the return on your investment in goal setting.

    What does it mean to be “goal-driven?” It seems obvious that someone who is driven by goals would be focused on achievement and have a strong sense of purpose.

    So, is it a good thing to be goal driven? I suppose the answer to that question really depends on how effective we are at setting goals and implementing strategies to achieve them.  

    Goals unite us; they orient individuals and teams toward a common sense of purpose. Goals provide the insight needed to shape the activities of our day; they shape our destiny. So, as a business owner, it is vital that we take time to reflect deeply upon our goals and to cascade and communicate them effectively inside our companies so that they are a positive and powerful force in our business.

    Big, Hairy, Audacious Goals

    Effective goal setting starts with an inspirational statement of vision—a long-term goal, perhaps 10 or more years into the future, that represents our ambitions, our dreams. They represent everything that we want to achieve in our business or in life. Jim Collins calls these long-term, dreamy goal statements of vision BHAGs—Big, Hairy, Audacious, Goals. BHAGs are moon shots; or in today’s vision, a manned trip to Mars. BHAGs are, by definition, the kind of goals that change the world represented by your dreams, however big they may be.

    Setting SMART Business Objectives

    Linked directly to the inspirational vision are business objectives—the quantifiable and time-bound measures of that which we want to achieve in the next one to three years. Business objectives set the stage for what the business will achieve during a specific time period. They set the stage for the foundation of business strategy.

    Business objectives are achieved in steps, represented by short-term goals. These goals are often defined as needing to be SMART in nature—SMART meaning Specific, Measureable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-Bound. SMART goals are the most common and are the ones that we should remain most mindful of during the course of our day. They set the pace and focus of our day and are the primary motivators for getting things done.

    RELATED: An inspiring vision, an effective plan, and other secrets of successful small businesses.

    How a Business Coach Can Help

    Business coaches provide much-needed insight, experience and discipline to business owners. They help put these factors into play to bring about positive change in business practices in order to achieve more than is possible without the use of a coach. Consider contacting a business coach to help set inspirational and achievable goals that are well-communicated throughout your company.

    1Direction certified ActionCOACH Brian Alquist has over 35 years of business experience. 1 Direction helps small business owners focus on the importance of goal setting, which is critical to the success and sustainability of their business. Contact 1 Direction by clicking here and secure a free coaching session for your business to begin understanding how to translate leadership into success.


    Share
  • Email
  • Compass Payroll